Calshot & Netley

I wanted to see how close l could get to the decommissioned and partially redeveloped site of the old power station at Fawley and take some pictures of tower blocks I had seen at Netley, just down the coast from Southampton. Calshot seemed like a good gamble for the power station. I got some reasonable shots, and I can see how I can get closer next time. Technically, there’s still a lot of learning needed about how aperture affects the quality of the pictures I’m taking, as well as remembering to weigh the tripod down and locking the mirror in a raised position to reduce blurring when taking longer exposures so a lot of what I took had to be junked. The best of what’s left can be seen here.

Calshot & Netley

A new gallery: Hythe

Out one morning doing my day job, I knew I was going to have a few minutes to kill. I had been hoping to get a look at the decommissioned power station at Fawley on the Solent in Hampshire but I didn’t quite have enough time to get there and negotiate any restricted access. So, taking a slight detour, I went to the town centre of Hythe and took these.

A new gallery: Hythe

Why taking pictures matters to me

So, while I’m kept busy learning the “how” of photography. You know, taking pictures, making mistakes, I’m also learning about WordPress, web hosting, plugins and various other ways of spending money.

That led me to ask if I was getting value for the investment for my time and money, which led me to “why?”. I didn’t have to think too much about it, there is a solidity to the architecture I photograph which gives an appearance of security at a superficial level. The beauty of this is reflected by photographers like Stefano Perego, IƱigo Bujedo Aguirre and Roberto Conte. In their portfolios I came across pictures that hinted at transience and decay which I found appealing. Digging around, I found work by Arseniy Kotov and Austin Granger that I like, a lot. The process by which architecture ages, and the effect of that ageing on those who experience it.

So, the answer to the question? Right now, my photography is a projection of my personal experience of ageing as I progress in the latter half of my life. There’s a personal project in there somewhere.